Gentan Research Network logo

Home

What's New?

 

SEARCH the

Gentian Research Network

and Rutgers University:

GENTIANS
Classification (newest)
List of genera
List by tribe

Gentian characteristics
Gentianales

What are gentians?

Photo gallery

RESEARCH
Research projects

People, addresses
Literature, publications 
Links
Add info to
this site

TOPICS
Anatomy

Classification

Common names
Ecology - Natural history

Endangered species

Ethnobotany - Uses

Gentian violet

Horticulture

Who eats gentians?

Morphology

Phylogeny

 

for kids!

GEOGRAPHY
Floras
Latin America
North America

TRIBES

Chironieae

Exaceae

Gentianeae

Helieae

Potalieae

Saccifolieae
_____________________


Information in other languages:

   

_____________________

This page is maintained 
by Dr. Lena Struwe 
(e-mail), and hosted by
Rutgers University
, USA

Credits

updated: 01/19/11 

Pests on gentians:
insects, fungi, viruses, and mammals that eat or are associated with gentians

photos of animals on gentians
animals living on associated with gentians

 

Butterflies:

The larvae of the butterfly Gynnidomorpha permixtana feeds on Gentiana in Europe and Asia.

The larvae of the fritillary Mellicta variais is reported to feed on Gentiana.

The caterpillar of the rare Alcon blue butterfly Maculinea alcon is initially feeding on Gentianella pneumonanthe. It has a very complicated and interesting life history that involves being parasites in ant nests.

 

Moths:

The caterpillar of several species of Stenoptilia (a moth) feeds on the flowers of Blackstonia, Centaurium, EustomaGentiana, and Gentianella species.

The caterpillar of Grammia quenseli feeds on the flowers of Gentiana species.

The hawk-moth Ocnogyna parasita is known to feed on Gentiana.

The pug Eupithecia satyrata is living on Gentianella.

The caterpillar of the moth Aethes aurofasciana, is reported to have Gentianella clusii as host-plant.

Falseuncaria ruficiliana is reported to feed on Gentianella verna.

 

Beetles:

Epicauta pensylvanica (Black Blister Beetle) has been found eating on flowers of Gentiana  puberulenta and G. saponaria, and smaller beetles can force themselves into its flowers to eat the pollen (link).

 

Ants:

Ants are often seen on the calyces of Chelonanthus plants (photo), and also live inside the hollow stems of Tachia.  They also visit the calyces of Anthocleista, which has extrafloral nectaries. In Swertia flowers, they visit the corolline nectaries, situated on the inner side of the petals.

 

Mammals:

The giant panda eats gentians, but its main diet is bamboo leaves.

Deers have been reported to eat bottle gentians in North America, despite their bitter taste (Gentiana andrewsii and related species).

 

Nematodes and other soil critters:

Root-knot nematode damage caused by Meloidogyne javanica can be found in Eustoma.

 

Fungi:

Pyrenochaeta gentianicola and P. terrestris (Ascomycota) causes pink root rot on Gentiana scabra var. buergeri.

Phoma gentianae-sino-ornatae (Deuteromycota) causes root rot in Gentiana sino-ornata (Punithalingam & Harling, 1993).

 

Bacteria:

 

 

Viruses:

'Clover yellow vein virus' can be found in Gentiana.

'Cucumber mosaic virus' affects gentians.

'Tomato spotted wilt virus' affects Eustoma.

 

Links:

Plant Viruses On-line (Gentianaceae) (link)

Virus infections in Gentiana species (link)

 

References:

 

 Lena Struwe, 2003

 

Gentian Research Network, 2002-2011.
For corrections and additions, contact Lena Struwe at struwe@aesop.rutgers.edu